Category Archives: Hemp

1st Annual Colorado Hemp Project

Join Farmers, Ranchers and Eastern Colorado Neighbors at the 1st Annual Colorado Hemp Project entitled THE NEW AGRICULTURE IN AMERICA. The festival will be held on September 28th 2014 from 11am-6pm at Brammer’s farm located at Hwy 138 and Pioneer Rd. Sterling, Colorado. Get directions here.
Learn about this amazing plant and its over 25,000 uses with Exhibits, a Farmers Market, Entertainment and Musicians include Rob Trueblood and his guitar, Josh Rabe and guitar, Kady Bow and Tony Tave and The Blues Krewe
This is a Children friendly event and all are welcome!
Special guests include Doug Fine, author of Hemp Bound, Charlie Larson CEO of Global Hemp who will be flying in from Canada, Dr. Nolan Kane from CU Boulder, Jason Lauve, Executive Director of Hemp Cleans and Zev Paiss with the Rocky Mountain Hemp Association.
Vendor space is available for farmers market and artisans. Please contact Danielle Billings at coloradohempproject@gmail.com or 720-606-9555.

The Colorado Hemp Project was planted with many volunteers on May 19, 2014 as one of America’s first legal hemp farms in Sterling, Colorado and licensed by the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

We have seen amazing growth on this crop and along the way have had many people helping to make this one of the most impressive fields of hemp planted in America. We have had scientists from Boulder, CO and Florida come to inspect and test the plants to insure their quality and legality since they must test under .3% THC to be classified as industrial hemp.

“Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth & protection of the country.”
– Thomas Jefferson, U.S.
President and Hemp Farmer

hemp-field

Source: http://www.coloradohempproject.com/

Hemp fibers can be turned into electrodes capable of better storing energy in super capacitors.

whoneedsgraphene

Using cannabis, scientists discover inexpensive way to dramatically boost battery storage potential

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

by: Ethan A. Huff

A plant that is still banned in most of the U.S. offers amazing energy-storage potential that far exceeds anything currently on the market. Researchers presenting at the recent 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society revealed that fibers from the hemp plant, a variety of the cannabis plant, can be turned into electrodes capable of better storing energy in supercapacitors.
The best material currently available for supercapacitor electrodes is graphene, a light-weight material that is both strong and able to be made thin enough to store high amounts of energy. Scientists have been developing novel ways to utilize graphene in things like batteries, touch-screen smartphones and devices, water filtration systems and solar panels, making these products more efficient and easier to recharge.

Continue reading

Colorado and Washington state in no hurry to categorize Marijuana as as farm product…http://www.denverpost.com/marijuana/ci_25098995/marijuana-farmers-unlikely-see-farm-tax-perks

Colorado marijuana farmers unlikely to see farm tax perks

By KRISTEN WYATT Associated Press

Posted:   02/09/2014 11:12:44 AM MST5 comments | Updated:   about 16 hours ago

Marijuana plants at BotanaCare 21  in Northglenn.

Marijuana plants at BotanaCare 21 in Northglenn. (Craig F. Walker, Denver Post file photo)

Marijuana farmers and agricultural tax breaks are the next wrinkle facing the states that have legal weed as lawmakers debate how to tax the product while it’s growing.

Legislatures in both Colorado and Washington are taking a look at pot farmers this session.

The states have already decided how to tax finished marijuana. But they are still mulling taxes as pot is produced, such as how the land on which marijuana is grown should be assessed for property taxes.

Some lawmakers in both states say marijuana growers shouldn’t be eligible for any taxation perks afforded to farmers that grow conventional crops. Others say that marijuana while it’s growing should be treated like the hops and barley that go on to become highly taxed alcohol.

Colorado lawmakers delayed a vote last week on whether marijuana greenhouses should be considered agricultural or commercial property. The bill, meant to codify the already-common practice of assessing conventional nurseries and greenhouses, ran into confusion when its sponsor added a last-minute amendment to ban pot growers from getting the advantage.

Republican Sen. Kevin Grantham said he wanted pot growers to “not see any benefit from the ag designation.”

Grantham opposed marijuana legalization in 2012, but said his latest effort to block marijuana tax breaks isn’t a knock on the growers. Instead, he says, he simply wanted to keep the focus of his bill on traditional crops and avoid a marijuana debate.

“It’s not the fight we’re fighting right now,” Grantham said before his bill was first heard. Later the same day, while explaining his bill to colleagues, Grantham joked that his effort backfired, and that the pot language was “quickly growing to be the fun part of this bill now, apparently.”

Washington lawmakers, meanwhile, are considering a bill to prohibit marijuana growers from qualifying for agriculture tax breaks for 10 years—giving the state time to collect information and make a decision.

The states flouting federal drug law and establishing commercial pot industries have settled how to tax marijuana once it’s dried and ready to smoke. But how to tax growing marijuana and the land it’s grown on is still under debate.

“We’re too early in the process to make a determination how to do this right,” said Meg Sanders, owner of Gaia Plant-Based Medicine in Denver.

Sanders owns a three-store chain of medical marijuana dispensaries and a 35,000-square-foot warehouse in Denver where her marijuana is grown. Denver considers marijuana growing sites commercial property, while a warehouse growing commercial tomatoes or lettuce is considered “other agriculture.”

The difference for tax purposes is significant, though rates vary by county.

“I believe that retail marijuana should be treated as any other agricultural crop in a state where it is legal. It is a plant, just like any other plant grown for consumption,” Sanders said.

Colorado voters last year overwhelmingly approved steep taxes on finished marijuana, which is taxed at least 25 percent, in addition to local taxes. But Colorado law is still murky on how growing marijuana should be taxed.

Grantham believes marijuana producers should enjoy none of the property tax perks afforded to conventional farmers. Others point out that alcohol is highly taxed, but the hops and barley raised to make it qualify for agriculture tax rates.

“Why should this be any different?” asked Sen. Jessie Ulibarri, D-Westminster. Ulibarri’s district includes many marijuana warehouses located along Interstate 70 just north of Denver.

Grantham’s bill awaits a vote in the Senate Finance Committee. The agriculture assessment change wouldn’t cost the state any money, and almost all local assessors already use the agricultural property tax category for conventional greenhouses and nurseries. Any differing tax collections would be felt at the county level, with no estimates available. Current Colorado law says that medical marijuana growers are eligible for no agricultural tax breaks, but the law is silent on how recreational pot land should be taxed.

In Washington, lawmakers have yet to vote on a bill prohibiting marijuana growers from qualifying for agriculture tax breaks.

Washington officials estimate that the industry could currently qualify for three dozen different tax breaks, largely surrounding agricultural production. But a state House committee is exploring a bill that would block those tax breaks for 10 years.

Democratic Rep. Reuven Carlyle, a sponsor of the bill, said he doesn’t think the tax preferences were designed to help the marijuana industry, which is currently under development.

“I don’t know that we have a problem in the marketplace that these exemptions would be designed to fix,” said Carlyle, who represents portions of Seattle.

Washington officials estimate that the new rules would increase state and local tax revenues by a combined $3.5 million over the span of one year.

Washington lawmakers have not scheduled any votes on the bill.

Both states voted in 2012 to legalize and regulate the recreational use of pot by adults over 21, with retail marijuana shops allowed. Sales began Jan. 1 in Colorado and are due to begin in Washington in the coming months.

Marijuana in Washington will be taxed 25 percent at three possible transfer points from production to retail sale, plus sales taxes. Colorado voters approved a 25 percent sales and excise tax on finished marijuana, plus local taxes.

Chinese History of Marijuana and Hemp Cultivation

Really great timeline of Chinease history of Hemp farming and use of Medical Marijuana.

http://antiquecannabisbook.com/chap2B/China/CharacterHistory.htm

 

“Like the practice of medicine around the world, early Chinese doctoring was based on the concept of demons. If a person were ill, it was because some demon had invaded his body. The only way to cure him was to drive the demon out. The early priest-doctors resorted to all kinds of tricks, some of which were rather sophisticated, like drug therapy, which we will examine shortly. Other methods involved outright magic. By means of charms, amulets, spells, incantations, exhortations, sacrifices, etc., the priest-doctor did his utmost to find some way of getting the upper hand over the malevolent demon believed responsible for an illness.”

Among the weapons to come out of the magical kit bag of the ancient Chinese conjurers were cannabis stalks into which snake-like figures were carved. Armed with these war hammers, they went to do battle with the unseen enemy on his home ground – the sickbed. Standing over the body of the stricken patient, his cannabis stalk poised to strike, the priest pounded the bed and commanded the demon to be gone. If the illness were psychosomatic and the patient had faith in the conjurer, he occasionally recovered. If his problem were organic, he rarely improved.

Whatever the outcome, the rite itself is intriguing. Although there is no way of knowing for sure how it came about, the Chinese tell a story about one of their emperors named Liu Chi-nu that may explain the connection between cannabis, snakes, and illness. One day Liu was out in the fields cutting down some hemp, when he saw a snake. Taking no chances that it might bite him, he shot the serpent with an arrow. The next day he returned to the place and heard the sound of a mortar and pestle. Tracking down the noise, he found two boys grinding marijuana leaves. When he asked them what they were doing, the boys told him they were preparing a medicine to give to their master who had been wounded by an arrow shot by Liu Chi-nu. Liu Chi-nu then asked what the boys would do to Liu Chi-nu if they ever found him. Suprisingly, the boys answered that they could not take revenge on him because Liu Chi-nu was destined to become emperor of China. Liu berated the boys for their foolishness and they ran away, leaving behind the medicine. Some time later Liu himself was injured and he applied the crushed marijuana leaves to his wound. The medicine healed him and Liu subsequently announced his discovery to the people of China and they began using it for their injuries.

Another story tells of a farmer who saw a snake carrying some marijuana leaves to place on the wound of another snake. The next day the wounded snake was healed. Intrigued, the farmer tested the plant on his own wound and was cured.[17]

Whether these stories had anything to do with the idea that marijuana had magical power or not, the fact is that despite the progress of Chinese medicine far beyond the age of superstition, the practice of striking beds with stalks made from marijuana stems continued to be followed until the Middle Ages.[18]”


Some Chinese denounced marijuana as the “liberator of sin”.[22] A late edition of the Pen Ts’au asserted that if too many marijuana seeds were eaten, they would cause one to “see demons”. But if taken over a long time, “one can communicate with the spirits”.[23]

However, by the first century A.D., Taoists became interested in magic and alchemy,[24] and were recommending addition of cannabis seeds to their incense burners. The hallucinations thus produced were highly valued as a means of achieving immortality.[25]

For some people, seeing spirits was the main reason for using cannabis. Meng Shen, a seventh-century physician, adds, however, that if anyone wanted to see spirits in this way, he would have to eat cannabis seeds for at least a hundred days.[26]

The Chinese have always been a highly reserved people, a nation rarely given to excesses. Temperance and restraint are cherished virtues of their society. But these are ideal traits, not always easy to live up to. And on more than one occasion, the waywardness of segments of the Chinese population was denounced by the authorities.

In a book attributed to Shen-Nung’s successor, the “yellow emperor”, for example, the author felt that alcoholism had truly gotten out of hand:

Nowadays people use wine as a beverage and they adopt recklessness as usual behaviour. They enter the chamber of love in an intoxicated condition; their passions exhaust their vital forces; their cravings dissipate their essence; they do not know how to find contentment with themselves; they are not skilled in the control of their spirits. They devote all their attention to the amusement of their minds, thus cutting themselves off from the joys of long life. Their rising and retiring is without regularity. For these reasons they reach only one half of the hundred years and then they degenerate.[27]

Alcohol, in fact, was a much more serious problem in China than marijuana, and opium overshadowed both in the attention it later received. The Chinese experiment with marijuana as a psychoactive agent was really more of a flirtation than an orgy. Those among the Chinese who hailed it as the “giver of delight” never amounted to more than a small segment of the population.”



Hemp is getting federal approval in the new farm bill! Follow the link to the news video…http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/02/05/as-states-weigh-legalizing-marijuana-the-feds-legalize-hemp/

As states weigh legalizing marijuana, the feds legalize hemp
BY JEFF SIMON
February 5 at 9:44 am
More
Comments

It might be a long time before the federal government legalizes recreational marijuana. But once President Obama signs the new five-year farm bill that won passage in the Senate on Tuesday, its less controversial cousin, hemp, will have the all-clear.
A short clause buried deep in the 959-page bill authorizes colleges and universities to grow industrial hemp for research purposes, so long as their state permits the growth and cultivation of the plant.
Right now, that’s nine states: California, Oregon, Montana, Colorado, North Dakota, Kentucky, West Virginia, Vermont, and Maine. Another 11 states have bills pending before their legislatures this year.
Ed O’Keefe contributed to this report.

Marijuana has always had the power to change history

The history of marijuana always seemed interesting to me. Then I grew up and realized it is. In fact so interesting that it’s amazing its history at all. However, here in beautiful Denver, Colorado we are starting to see why the farmers way back when we’re encouraged to grow hemp on their farms. Duh! It’s obviously one of the most useful plants america has known of. And ya know government likes money so… You’d think they’d have took it a little further. With cannabis sativas almost infinite uses (including great insulative properties, food,fuel,cleaning the air,soil quality,construction, reducing the use of toxic farm chemicals,protecting forests,clothing,building material,jewelry making,medicinal properties, and oh yeah by the way its an excellent source of nutrition and youll feel real nice through it all) not only does it make sense to grow it makes sense why a new nation still learning about the land and it’s endless love and with a trying road ahead would want to invest in the farming of hemp. And they did. Until they didn’t.

“The Virginia Company, by decree of King James I in 1619, ordered every colonist to grow 100 plants specifically for export. Thus, England’s only colony in America began to grow hemp in order to meet this obligation and, soon, to serve a growing demand in other colonies. George Washington grew hemp at Mount Vernon as one of his three primary crops. The use of hemp for rope and fabric was ubiquitous throughout the 18th and 19th centuries in the United States. Medicinal preparations of cannabis became available in American pharmacies in the 1850s following an introduction to its use in Western medicine by William O’Shaughnessy a decade earlier in 1839.” -Wikipedia (Deitch, Robert (2003). Hemp – American History Revisited. New York City: Algora Publishing. p. 16. ISBN 0-87586-206-3.)

Increased restrictions and labeling of cannabis as a poison began in many states from 1906 onward. Prohibitions began in the 1920s. By the mid-1930s Cannabis was regulated as a drug in every state, including 35 states that adopted the Uniform State Narcotic Drug Act. The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937, Pub. 238, 75th Congress, 50 Stat. 551 (Aug. 2, 1937) was a United States Act that placed a tax on the sale of cannabis.

After the Philippines fell to Japanese forces in 1942, the Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Army urged farmers to grow hemp fiber and tax stamps for cultivation were issued to farmers. Without any change in the Marijuana Tax Act, over 400,000 acres of hemp were cultivated between 1942 and 1945. The last commercial hemp fields were planted in Wisconsin in 1957. Just watch hemp for victory, a 1943 film for farmers. A film that teaches about hemps history before the states and see for yourself. The film encourages farmers to grow hemp and briefly describes the various methods they can choose to use that have proven good.

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0xHCkOnn-A&feature=youtube_gdata_player)

Got to love that special tax stamp for a dollar. Maybe in 1942 but last time I checked it was about 30% here in sunny Colorado. However, with an instate ID or a red card you can knock that down to 15%, which is a relatively fair rate. Considering. Many dispensaries have to carry a lot of cash due to banks not accepting “drug money” and the fact that some of that money is going directly to the community boosting the economy as well as keeping ppl off other easily attainable drugs (you know the real drugs…pharmacuticals and the like.) I’m still debating whether or not it is better to give my hard earned money for medicinal marijuana to dispensaries and recreational stores over my buddy, friend, “hippy stoner kid” , because the tax is just out of the roof, and again you must be part of their system. Still, it has a come a far way from harmless kids and adults alike going to jail for getting high. And this Is progress. Usually the tokers are way more informative than any doctor I’ve been too. “You need to sleep more?..here smoke this.” “You need to eat more smoke this, headache….smoke this. ” I much rather know what is going into my body, proven not to have horrendous side effects than getting random chemicals, who knows what else inside that pill prescribed by a supposedly scholared Phd. Here’s some things they don’t teach you in med school. There’s a reason why too, profit.

So after they decided it was a good and economical idea to grow hemp, why on earth would they have stopped. This is where it usually gets interesting. Government bans drinking, prohibition causes them to lose money, they un-ban it. Sounds about right. So why did they choose to keep it banned till 2014. Not only have they collected money from the war on drugs, they have put many a good people in jail using our tax dollars to keep them there for smoking in their own home,or growing,. I still can’t imagine that the money made doing this would equal half that as if they would have continued the cultivation of marijuana creating an economy that today would look a lot nicer than it currently does. In my humble opinion I think America made a huge mistake turning their back on the farming of hemp in pursuit of money and control, it’s greed.

“Anyone concerned about the failure of our 69-billion-a-year War on Drugs should watch this 12-minute program. You will meet front line ranking police officers who give us a devastating report on why it cannot work. It is a must see for any journalist or public official dealing with this issue” -Walter Cronkite

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LayaGk0TMDc&feature=youtube_gdata_player)

“In 1936 the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) noticed an increase of reports of people smoking marijuana, which further increased in 1937. The Bureau drafted a legislative plan for Congress seeking a new law, and the head of the FBN, Harry J. Anslinger, ran a campaign against marijuana” – Wikipedia

(“Harry J. Anslinger, U. S. Commissioner of Narcotics and Will Oursler : The Murderers, the story of the narcotic gangs, Pages: 541-554, 1961”.)

( Hempology.org. 1945-04-26. Retrieved 2011-03-09.
“Additional Statement of H.J. Anslinger, Commissioner of Narcotics”. Druglibrary.org. Retrieved 2006-03-25.)

“Newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst’s empire of newspapers began publishing what is known as “yellow journalism”, demonizing the cannabis plant and putting emphasis on connections between cannabis and violent crime. Several scholars argue that the goal was to destroy the hemp industry,largely as an effort of Hearst, Andrew Mellon and the Du Pont family. They argue that with the invention of the decorticator hemp became a very cheap substitute for the wood pulp that was used in the newspaper industry.They also believe that Hearst felt that this was a threat to his extensive timber holdings. Mellon was Secretary of the Treasury, as well as the wealthiest man in America, and had invested heavily in nylon, DuPont’s new synthetic fiber. He considered nylon’s success to depend on its replacement of the traditional resource, hemp” -wikipedia

“In 1973 President Richard Nixon’s “Reorganization Plan Number Two” proposed the creation of a single federal agency to enforce federal drug laws and Congress accepted the proposal, as there was concern regarding the growing availability of drugs.As a result, on July 1, 1973, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) and the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement (ODALE) merged to create the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).On December 1, 1975, the Supreme Court ruled that it was “not cruel or unusual for Ohio to sentence someone to 20 years for having or selling cannabis.”-wikipedia

“In 1976 California law reduced the penalty for personal possession of an ounce or less of marijuana from a felony to a citable misdemeanor with a maximum fine of $100. Possession of more than an ounce was made a misdemeanor, making the maximum fine $500 and/or six months in jail. After the law went into effect, the state’s annual spending towards marijuana laws went down 74%. Prior to the law, the state had been spending from $35 million to $100 million” -wikipedia

“During the Reagan Administration the Sentencing Reform Act provisions of the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 created the Sentencing Commission, which established mandatory sentencing guidelines. The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 reinstated mandatory prison sentences, including large scale cannabis distribution. Later an amendment created a three-strikes law, which created mandatory 25-years imprisonment for repeated serious crimes – including certain drug offenses- and allowed the death penalty to be used against “drug kingpins.” -wikipedia

“In 1996 California voters passed Proposition 215, which legalized medical cannabis. The Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative was created to “provide seriously ill patients with a safe and reliable source of medical cannabis, information and patient support” in accordance with Proposition 215.
In January 1998 the U.S. Government sued Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative for violating federal laws created as a result of Controlled Substances Act of 1970. On May 14, 2001, the United States Supreme Court ruled in United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Coop that federal anti-drug laws do not permit an exception for medical cannabis and rejected the common-law medical necessity defense to crimes enacted under the Controlled Substances Act because Congress concluded cannabis has “no currently accepted medical use” when the act was passed in 1970.” -wikipedia

“In 1978 Robert Randall sued the federal government for arresting him for using cannabis to treat his glaucoma. The judge ruled Randall needed cannabis for medical purposes and required the Food and Drug Administration set up a program to grow cannabis on a farm at the University of Mississippi and to distribute 300 cannabis cigarettes a month to Randall. In 1992 George H. W. Bush discontinued the program after Randall tried to make AIDS patients eligible for the program. Thirteen people were already enrolled and were allowed to continue receiving cannabis cigarettes; today the government still ships cannabis cigarettes to seven people. Irvin Rosenfeld, who became eligible to receive cannabis from the program in 1982 to treat rare bone tumors, urged the George W. Bush administration to reopen the program; however, he was unsuccessful.”  -wikipedia

In 1973 Oregon decriminalized cannabis. Laws changed again in 1995 that reduced penalties. Colorado, Alaska, Ohio, and California followed suit in 1975. By 1978 Mississippi, North Carolina, New York, and Nebraska had some form of cannabis decriminalization.

“On November 6, 2012, Colorado Amendment 64 (2012) was passed by initiative, thereby legalizing the recreational use of cannabis. Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper signed two bills on May 28, 2013 that made Colorado the world’s first fully regulated recreational cannabis market for adults. Hickenlooper explained to the media: “Certainly, this industry will create jobs. Whether it’s good for the brand of our state is still up in the air. But the voters passed Amendment 64 by a clear majority. That’s why we’re going to implement it as effectively as we possibly can.” In its independent analysis, the Colorado Center on Law & Policy found that the state could expect a to see “$60 million in total combined savings and additional revenue for Colorado’s budget with a potential for this number to double after 2017” – Wikipedia

“On February 5, 2013 Colorado representative Jared Polis introduced Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2013 (H.R. 499; 113th Congress), a bill that would decriminalize marijuana on the federal level, instead treating it as a substance to be regulated in a similar manner to alcohol. The act has not been approved by the Congress” -Wikipedia

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ending_Federal_Marijuana_Prohibition_Act_of_2013_(H.R._499;_113th_Congress)

So, here we are today. Fighting to continue the restoration of our right to grow. In 1619 kings ordered farmers to grow, by 1942 farmers were watching films on why hemp is the best crop to grow. Then something took a turn and around 1936 certain powers realized they could be out of business due to the fact that marijuana was so useful it could save forests from the devastating effects that later came from wood pulp for paper production. Hemp farming threatened the very existence of companies looking to make a big buck on land resources. Dupont had money invested in synthetic fibers which hemp can also replace, for much less. As the truth came out about hemps potential, the powers that be quickly saw and redirected the stereotypes to fit their needs. Ignoring the needs of the people, and country America set out to blacklist the marijuana industry.

It is baffling how our government does business. If they aren’t the only ones making money…they pass bogus laws to continue enslaving us to the machine. That’s fine we will adapt, we will be patient, we will grow anyways, we will smoke anyways, and rise above it. WE have the power to change history. We know that money isn’t power or happiness. With that knowledge we will find an even better solution to all the solutions our government divided up into problems. Just as the government took action to control marijuana farming, thus creating more problems such as crime and countless victims spending time and money on fines and jail time
, they seek to control our food as well, for profit of course (more on why the farming industry used to be a solution but now is a problem later). With the re introduction of hemp farming we could change the world. Bring back the good ol’ days, so to speak. Only better because we are more aware and conscious of our actions and the destruction or peace they can cause.